Mentoring Teaching Candidates Workshop

This workshop examines various approaches to mentoring field experiences for teacher candidates.  Topics will include examining the role of a mentoring teacher, setting expectations, getting teacher candidates involved with students, helping teacher candidates reflect on their teaching, and engaging teacher candidates with inquiry projects. In addition, the requirements of different field experiences will be discussed.  Finally, special attention will be given to the utilization of teacher candidates to increase instructional opportunities for students and personal growth opportunities for teachers.

Workshop Dates & Locations

AVAILABLE TO OHIO TEACHERS
(Does not apply to out-of-state residents)

FREE OR REDUCED TUITION!

Three free, online professional development workshops on mentoring will be offered by Ohio University this fall semester.  These workshops can also be taken for course credit at the rate of $115 per credit hour.  The workshops begin on October 1st.  Interested teachers should contact Lisa Dael <dael@ohio.edu>

Mentoring Teacher Candidates (1 credit hour)
Instructor: Tammy Smith, Logan-Hocking Middle School

This online workshop will examine various approaches to mentoring early field experiences for teacher candidates.  Topics will include examining the role of a mentoring teacher, setting expectations, getting teacher candidates involved with students, and helping teacher candidates reflect on their teaching.   Special attention will be given to the utilization of teacher candidates to increase instructional opportunities for students and personal growth opportunities for teachers.

Co-Teaching (1 credit hour)
Instructor: Maretta Ray, Vinton County High School

The purpose of this online workshop is to explore co-teaching with teacher candidates to improve student learning.  Participants will engage in using Marilyn Friend’s six co-teaching strategies to develop innovative instructional approaches for improving student learning.  There will be a special emphasis on designing, developing, and implementing strategies that utilize teacher candidates to develop differentiated instruction for individual students and small groups of students.

Mentoring Quality Matters (2 credit hours)
Instructor: Stephanie Starcher, Fort Frye Local School District

This online professional development workshop is comprised of three self-paced modules designed to assist mentors in the preparation of teacher candidates during the professional internship.  Special emphasis is placed on helping professional interns transition into the profession by using The Ohio Continuum of Teacher Development.  The Continuum describes teachers’ developmental progression throughout the course of their careers.


Planning

Developmental Curriculum for Clinical Experiences

The Developmental Curriculum for Clinical Experiences creates an unbroken sequence of activities for teacher candidates from preparation to in service. The vertical axis moves provides a description of three levels of development in a teacher preparation program. The bottom row, which is entitled “Exploring,” consists of the most introductory experiences in clinical settings, such as learning names, recording grades, and taking the lunch count. The second level is entitled “Engaging” and is located at the midpoint of the vertical axis. Associated with the Engaging level are activities consonant with teaching single lesson plan, such as creating a formative assessment tool, creating scaffolds to support learning, and reflecting on an individual lesson. The top row of the chart, which is entitled “Emerging,” describes activities associated with designing and implementing teaching units, such as developing an evaluation plan, designing activities that encourages students to integrate information from multiple sources, and designing and implementing multiple formative assessment strategies for the purpose of adjusting instruction.

These experiences are in alignment with the Ohio Continuum of Teacher Development, which describes teacher development as it occurs over the course of a career. The “Emerging” level is the last level of the Developmental Curriculum for Clinical Experiences and the first level of the Ohio Continuum of Teacher Development.  Thus, the last level of our clinical curriculum is consistent with the description of the skills a beginning teacher should have upon graduation from a teacher preparation program.  Four other levels follow on the Ohio Continuum of Teacher Development, including “Developing,” “Proficient,” “Accomplished,” and “Distinguished.” When combined, both documents provide a continuous description of teacher development from a teacher’s very first clinical experience until they are accomplished enough in their career to reach the “Distinguished” level of teaching.

Orientation Guides

Orientation guides can provide field experience students with a welcoming statement, the requirements for the field experience, an overview of your expectations as a mentoring teacher, descriptions of the classroom procedures, and your philosophy as a mentoring teacher. As you will see in the examples connected to this link, they may be as brief as one side of a page.

These guides should be given to field experience students during the first day they arrive in class or perhaps at your school’s orientation for field experience students.  Most teachers agree they are a handy tool for communicating expectations to field experience students, especially when your time for conferencing is very limited.  When time is especially limited, they can simply be handed to students.

Please download all zipped examples located: here.


Engagement

Getting Started

When a teacher candidate arrives in a classroom, it is important to get them started right away. One of the first things teachers want to do is help the candidates build relationships with their students. All the examples were contributed by mentor teachers.

Relationship Building activities offers examples designed to engage teacher candidates on the first day they arrive in the classroom. All the examples were contributed by mentor teachers.

Beginning activities provides examples designed for teacher candidates who are still very early in the field experience. These examples are organized by the number of students with whom the teacher candidate is engaged: individual, small group, or whole class. All the examples were contributed by mentor teachers.

Engaging Teacher Candidates Outside of the Classroom provides examples for involving teacher candidates in school experiences outside of the classroom. All the examples were contributed by mentor teachers.

Conceptual Framework

Teacher candidates very greatly in their prior experiences, knowledge, skills, and dispositions. Thus, their ability to engage with P-12 students will also vary. In all cases, however, teacher candidates should be constantly challenged to grow in their abilities to interact with P-12 students.

The conceptual Framework for Engaging Teacher Candidates is intended to serve as a planning document for individualizing field experiences. Classroom interactions involving more P-12 students and requiring more independent judgment (e.g. leading a whole class discussion) are more complex than tasks with fewer students and requiring little judgment (helping an absent student make up her homework assignment). The Conceptual Framework for Engaging Teacher Candidates provides examples of these differences and a framework for planning increased opportunities to grow and develop during their field experience.

See attached for an example: Conceptual Framework for Engagement.

See additional examples: Engaging Teacher Candidates Examples.

Practicing, Modeling, and Feedback

There are three important principles that guide the following mentoring:

1. Continuous practice

2. Modeling

3. Feedback

Continuous practice refers to the teaching fellows’ opportunity to teach a series of lessons in an unbroken sequence. Continuous practice can occur when the teacher candidate teaches more than one lesson on the same day (vertical model). Continuous practice can also occur when the teaching fellow has the opportunity to teach one or more classes on successive days. (Horizontal model).

Modeling occurs when the mentor teacher demonstrates some aspect of teaching practice before the teacher candidate attempts to implement it. Modeling can occur in both the vertical and horizontal models of continuous practice.

Giving feedback can further strengthen the impact of modeling. The mentor can point our key aspects of the mentor’s teaching strategy, discuss differences between the teaching of the mentor and the teaching fellow, and suggest future directions for the teaching fellow.

Click HERE for Example.

Asking Reflective Questions Assignment
Asking Reflective Questions Assignment
Asking Reflective Questions Example

Growth

Teacher candidates very greatly in their prior experiences, knowledge, skills, and dispositions. Thus, their ability to engage with P-12 students will also vary. In all cases, however, teacher candidates should be constantly challenged to grow in their abilities to interact with P-12 students.

The conceptual Framework for Engaging Teacher Candidates is intended to serve as a planning document for individualizing field experiences. Classroom interactions involving more P-12 students and requiring more independent judgment (e.g. leading a whole class discussion) are more complex than tasks with fewer students and requiring little judgment (helping an absent student make up her homework assignment). The Conceptual Framework for Engaging Teacher Candidates provides examples of these differences and a framework for planning increased opportunities to grow and develop during their field experience.

As all teachers know, a good bit of teaching occurs outside of the classroom. Teachers spend hours each day, planning and reflecting on their lessons. Developing these skills occurs concurrently as the teacher candidates’ interact with P-12 students and adds yet another level of complexity to learning to teach. Below are a series of planning documents intended to help teacher candidates grow in their ability to plan and reflect when building relationships with students, when working with individual students, when working with small groups, and working with the whole class. Each of these planning documents is an expansion of the Conceptual Framework for Engaging Teacher Candidates.

Relationship Building – a planning document that maps the teacher candidate’s growth from engaging in personal conservations to designing and implementing management, motivations, and conflict resolution plans.

Individual – a planning document that maps the teacher candidate’s growth from observing to tutoring to assessing to differntiating instruction for individual students.

Small Group -a planning document that maps the teacher candidates growth from co-designing to leading small group activities.

Whole Class – a planning document that maps the teacher candidates growth from taking attendance to implementing unit plans.

Content – a planning document that maps the teacher candidates growth from giving prescribed presentations to leading discussions and inquiry-based unit plans.


Reflection

Getting Started

Talking with Teacher Candidates can take many forms and serve many purposes. These conversations are often varied and can range in scope and duration from a quick aside made from the teacher to a teacher candidate, to troubleshooting a Teacher Candidate’s lesson plan, to conducting an exit conference at the end of a field experience. What is said during these exchanges may depend on the time available, the setting in which they occur, and the type of activity in which the teacher candidate is engaged. This wide range of conversations has been grouped into three categories below. In the following sections, you will look at different examples of conferring and create some new ones of your own.

Professionalism

Mentoring teachers often confer with teacher candidates about issues related with professionalism, such as professional dress, behaviors, ethics, and conforming to school policies. Click below for examples of different ways teachers have conferred with teacher candidates about professionalism. Read the attached for examples: Professional Examples.

Mentoring Teachers also confer with teacher candidates about issues related to interacting with students, such as relationship building, motivation, classroom management, and conflict resolution. See attached for examples of different ways teachers have conferred with teacher candidates about interacting with students. Read the attached examples: Conferring Examples.

Teaching

Mentoring teachers also confer with teacher candidates about issues related to teaching, such as planning lessons, reflecting on their teaching behaviors. See attached for examples of different ways teachers have conferred with teacher candidates about teaching. Read the attached examples: Teaching Examples.

Additional Reflecting Examples

Additional examples are located here: Other Conferring Examples.

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